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Event Report
Event Reports - Sun 'N Fun 2006

Sun 'N Fun 2006 - Much Excitement Awaits!
Friday, March 31, 2006
March 31, 2006
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Well, it's a typical busy Friday before Sun 'N Fun... but as always, we know that the hard work is well worth it.

Stay tuned and check back often, as we're planning on updating our reports every day. If you visit SNF, please come by and visit us in our tent behind the big blue hangars (same place we always are.)

Hope to see you in Lakeland!


Monday, April 3 - Part 1 (Pre-Show) April 3, 2006
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Article by Mike Whaley
 
NOTE: For the third year running, the Internet access that was supposed to be available at SNF has been, well, practically nonexistent (any Internet entrepreneurs out there take note...) Unfortunately, this has made it difficult to impossible to post updates with the usual next-day or so turnaround. We will do our best to catch up when the service is available. Thanks for your patience... we're taking lots of photos, which we'll bring to you ASAP. We think it'll be worth the wait :)

Monday was the final setup day, and the weather couldn't have been nicer... 85 degrees and clear, with a bit of a breeze. Setup for the tent and the campsite went very smoothly. We set up much like last year's display, with Rob Moler's beatuful Blue Skybolt/Firebolt (like many aircraft, this plane has features of both) is the featured attraction inside the main tent, with Barrett's Pitts S1-C on the corner, a bare Pitts S1 fuselage frame behind it and our tribute display to Curtis behind that. The aircraft parking areas weren't full yet, but they had a fair number of aircraft. It looks like we'll have a good turnout!

So without further ado, here we go with some photos... more to come later!


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The crew tries to remember which banner goes where... setup went really smoothly, actually.  
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This interesting ducted fan-powered car drew quite a bit of attention.  
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Only problem is, what happens when you get behind this guy at a stoplight?  
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EAAer are an inventive lot, to say the least.  
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Aeroshell makes a spectacular arrival, as usual.  
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The skywriter provides some good advice for free.  
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Ed Anderson developed his own Mazda rotary installation for his RV-6  
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Ed left the cowl open for a while, and quite a few curious folks stopped by to take a look.  
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Bill Clapp flew his KR-2S down from Valdosta GA with his daughter Elaine. Bill restores VW's for a living, but chose a Corvair to power his plane. He built this plane for about $7,000 including the engine(!)... and it's done well!  
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Dave Vargesko's Wagabond isn't the fanciest plane on earth, but every part of it is done well. Dave's Corvair-powered plane is a flyer, not a hangar queen!  
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We thought that this was an amusing juxtaposition of placards in the Wagabond's cockpit.  
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This freshly polished and painted taildragger Zenith CH-601XL belongs to our friends at The Corvair Authority - aka William Wynne and the hangar gang. This is a very well-done plane that flies a lot.  
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This plane has quite a fan out front.  
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This attractive Bakeng Deuce is for sale.  
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The Corben Baby Ace is one of the older homebuilt designs.  
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A Cub sitting in the grass... this is how life should be.  
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The Wittman Tailwind is a true classic. Decades after the first one flew, you still see a fair number of them being built and flown... fast.  
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The GlaStars are rapidly gaining popularity. These planes feature mixed construction of steel tube, structural composites, and aluminum.  
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The pilot of this Glasair obviously likes to race.  
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There are a lot of RV's here... but that's to be expected with a plane that outsells Cessna.  
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Like in many other area, high-intensity LED's are now being used to replace incandescent and gas-tube light bulbs in many applications. As usual, homebuilders are leading the way in what is bound to become normal practice in certified aircraft.  
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Another version of LED lights. Advantages include very long life, low power requirements, durability, and redundancy in case individual units burn out.  
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This is a really nice looking RV-9.  
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One guess as to this pilot's favorite team. (The bug must to be a Huskers fan also.)  
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This RV-10 was recently completed by James Younkin. This looks to be quite a versatile design and if the other RV designs are any indication, it's going to really set the standard for four-seat airplanes.  
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The RV-10 has an angle of Attack system installed. This is an angle sensor vane on the wingtip.  
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There is another AOA vane a couple of feet inboard from the wingtip.  
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Another view of the RV-10.  
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And of course, no airshow coverage would be complete without the traditional rubber pitot chicken!  
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Brian King's new low-cost design is called the BK1. It's a simple, one-seat plane designed to be inexpensive to build and operate. Power is from a half VW.  
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This pretty much says it all, doesn't it? This is the tail of a Sonex.  
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Those of you into prog-rock will recognize this logo instantly. It seems that this plane was once Just A Job To Do by an Illegal Alien living in a Home By The Sea. It was going to be called the Silver Rainbow. Mama is probably just Taking It All Too Hard, but That's All. It's Gonna Get Better once they move to the Second Home By The Sea.  
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This Harmon Rocket was very well done.  
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Patriotic color schemes are becoming increasingly popular.  
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The Radial Rocket and Turbine Lancair are both very fast.  
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The Comp Air isn't exactly sleek, but it can haul a BUNCH of stuff.  
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The Yellowbird Skybolt looks beautiful at sunset.  
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This little meadowlark seemed to be quite perplexed by all the big, noisy birds invading its territory.  
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The sun goes down on the flight line... tomorrow will be a busy day.  
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The sky was clear when the sun set, but I didn't see the green flash this time around.  

Monday, April 3 - Part 2 (Pre-Show) April 3, 2006
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Article by Mike Whaley
 
We couldn't fit it all on one page... more Monday photos!


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Adam aircraft returned with their inline piston-powered A500 and their twin-jet A700. You'll start seeing some of these in service soon.  
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This behemoth is a Gippsland Aeronautics GA8, made in Australia.  
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This Pitts Special has a nice yellow scheme.  
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Keith Campbell's nice Model 12 was on display by the IAC tent.  
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The sun sets on a beautiful day.  
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This Cessna Bobcat (T-50) seems to be taking in the sunset as well as an airliner flies overhead. When the Cessna was built, who could have imagined that we would routinely fly hundreds of folks at a time halfway across the world, non-stop and near the speed of sound... at a price that many average citizens could afford?  
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The Cessna O-2 Duck is often overlooked, but was a very important aircraft in Vietnam. It filled the gap between the O-1 and the arrival of the OV-10, and the Forward Air Controllers who flew them had one of the most dangerous and important jobs of all. When a FAC showed up, the Viet Cong and NVA knew to lay real low... those who didn't quickly found themselves in the midst of hell on earth as the FAC directed bombers, fighters, artillery, and naval big gunnery right onto their position.  
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The typical loadout was mostly 2.75 inch unguided White Phosphorus ('Willie Pete') marking rockets, with a few high-explosive HE rounds or occasionally even the larger Zuni rockets in case a target of opportunity came up. Here you can also see a log flare, used to illuminate the battlefield at night.  
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Precious Metal is a highly-modified P-51 with a Griffin engine up front. Hanging a Griffin, with its massive counter-rotating props, on the front of a P-51 isn't a new idea... famed racer and warbird pilot Steve Hinton successfully campaigned a similar racer named Red Baron in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The Red Baron isn't with us any longer, but Precious Metal sure captures the spirit of it.  
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You just don't see something like this every day.  
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Fosters - Australian for... exhaust covers?  
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True, the Mustang's original lines are classic... but even in highly-modified racer form, it's still a complete thoroughbred.  
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There were a fair number of warbirds, and though no bombers appeared, the lineup of front-line fighters was exciting. POP QUIZ: Name these planes!  
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The other end of the lineup.  
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Answer 1: F4U Corsair. That was really easy.  
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Plane number two: Supermarine Spitfire. RAF officers could often choose what letters to put on the side of their planes, and occasionally a bit of humor came out as seen here.  
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Arguably the best fighter to just miss WW2 service, the Bearcat has awesome performance. It held a piston-engine time-to-climb record that stood for decades.  
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This P-40 is from the Cavanaugh Flight Museum in Texas. A beautiful and rarely-seen aircraft!  
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I'm told that this logo was "cleaned up" a bit from the original wartime version...  
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A fighter just seems more "fighter-like" when it actually has a good old-fashioned manual gunsight, doesn't it?  
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The nose of the P-40 is very distinctive.  
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This O-1 is well-protected... and yes, it's in USMC colors. The O-1 had a long and distinguished history not only in every branch of the US military, but many foreign ones as well.  
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This DC-3 was on display in original American Airlines colors. Beautiful!  
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The warbird ramp is a runway, which is marked with a big flashing X to make sure that nobody tries to land on it (in case the dozens of large planes lining both sides isn't enough of a clue...)  
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Now, THIS is camping.  
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A unique biplane...  
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... I've always wondered what would happen if you painted a plane with glow-in-the-dark paint!  
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Even at night, this Piper PA-22 in the Vintage parking area was very pretty!  

Tuesday, April 4 April 4, 2006
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Article by Mike Whaley
 
Opening day was very good... great weather and a good crowd. The news of Sean Tucker having to bail out of his Oracle Challenger was surprising, but everyone was glad he was OK and the conversations quickly turned to whether he'd be here at SNF (he did.) Otherwise, it was the usual rush of getting into the "groove" of the airshow... talking to folks, taking in the sights, figuring out schedules so everyone can get lunch, etc. Some areas, like Paradise City (ie the Ultralight area) seemed to be a bit down in attendance, but others (Warbirds) seemed to be doing as well as last year. There was a big storm system to the north up in Tennesee and Georgia, so it's reasonable to think that at least some attendees are having trouble getting here early. We'll see what happens later in the week.


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Just before the gates officially open on SNF 2006, an early bird stops for a brief chat.  
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We set up a small memorial wall for Curtis Pitts. Many folks stopped by and checked it out. Curtis may be absent in body, but he'll always be with us and many others in spirit.  
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It didn't take long for visitors to start coming in to see what was new.  
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Dave greets a customer. We always enjoy getting to meet old friends, or meeting people face-to-face whom we've only known through the phone or email.  
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Barrett flies the Skybolt during the manufacturer's fly-by session. It was one of the loudest single-engine planes at the show, so far as we could tell.  
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Barrett flies by.  
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A Piper Cub flies by. Many, many Cubs arrived en mass to this year's Fly-in. The basic Cub design, despite being modified and updated in innumerable ways through the years, will always remain as a cornerstone of general aviation.  
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This New Standard D-25 was hopping rides... exactly what it was designed for in 1929. Neat plane!  
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Jabiru isn't the only Australian native at Sun 'N Fun. This (almost) purebred dingo seemed to enjoy the airplanes. He was very well-behaved and friendly, and seemed to act about like any other dog.  
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The "Juliet Row" camp area lies near the western end of the main runway. It's a unique spot to watch the show, providing a "side view" of the action.  
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T-6's fly past Juliet Row.  
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There were many T-28s. The Trojans have a very deep, throaty sound that personifies the term "warbird".  
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A camper gets a great view of a T-6 after landing from it's airshow fly-bys.  
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The Juliet Row area allows a very close-up view of the airshow planes taxiing back after they land on runway 9.  
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These guys are obviously enjoying the opportunity to be a part of the show.  
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This T-6 is painted in the colors of the Spanish Air Force. It would be hard to find a type of plane with more different and intersting color schemes than the T-6 / SNJ / Harvard community!  
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The Red Knight provides top cover...  
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The "Red Knight" T-33 puts out thick, dense smoke as it returns from a sunset sortie.  
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While many still think of trikes as "powered hang gliders", they've actually evolved into rather refined machines.  
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This CGS aircraft had sprightly performance.  
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Kolb had a "naked" Mark III on display. This is a pretty simple structure, but it's also strong. Construction is 4130 steel tube, with aluminum spars, ribs, and tail boom.  
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Kolb's Slingshot flies like, well, a slingshot. Wheeee!  
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"The deck angle is rather acute." Wheeeee!!! They also have several flavors of two-seaters available.  
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This light aircraft looks a bit helicopter-like. (The smoke in the background is from land clearing activity a mile or two down the road.)  
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Just Aircraft had a plane on display.  
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Yours Truly had his first light aircraft ride in a Maxair Drifter like this one, way back at Sun 'N Fun 1988. What a rush!  
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If this is the passenger's first ride, you can bet that she's yelling excitedly into the intercom right now about how cool this is!  
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For some reason, there weren't nearly the number of ultralights and light planes flying at Paradise City this day as you'd usually expect to see... but there's always a lot of variables at play in that. Hopefully we'll see more folks later this week.  

Wednesday, April 5 - Part 1 April 5, 2006
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Article by Mike Whaley
 
Wednesday continued with more nice weather and lots of visitors. All is going well!


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Dave Stone (in red shirt) narrates from the announcers's stand as Barrett Brummett flies by in the Skybolt during the manufacturer's showcase. Our 325hp IO-540 and the 4-bladed MT prop gives the Yellowbird a unique sound that's really hard to miss!  
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Dave tells the crowd about the Skybolt.  
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While you can't do any real acro during the fly-bys, at least we could use the smoke and do some high-speed runs and moderately fast pull-ups. High-performance takeoffs were also demonstrated. Even while flying the back side of the pattern, the Yellowbird drew attention with its sound!  
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Barrett completes a pass. Turn this photo over, and it could pass for a picture of a rocket launch from KSC.  
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The other end of the biplane scale could be represented by Waldo Wright Flying Service's 1929 D-25 New Standard biplane, made specifically for the purpose of barnstorming and sightseeing. Your author rode in one of these in 2002 and it was a great way to experience the nostalgia of open-cockpit flying... highly recommended!  
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You can see activity of all kinds. This helicopter was hopping rides all day long, except during the airshow when everyone who isn't participating is grounded.  
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Eclipse had their VLJ on display, and also flew during the showcase. Most experts believe that this plane and others like it will soon revolutionize the air travel landscape. Many orders have been placed.  
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Van's continued to reap the rewards of offering excellent aircraft kits, as their booth was quite busy. This is their new 4-place RV-10... could this challenge the dominance of planes like the Cherokee, Arrow, and 182 like the other RV's have outpaced their certified equivalents? Only time will tell!  
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This sleek craft is a SportCruiser from Czech Aircraft Works (CZAW), which has become a major player in the LSA manufacturing world.  
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Zenith had many planes on display in their corner display area. On the right is Phil Maxson's Corvair-powered CH-601XL Zodiac, the red and white one is the Zenith factory's Zodiac, and to the left you can see the CH-701 STOL and it's larger cousin the CH-801.  
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The Sparrowhawk gyro was on display. Since the problems with high-thrustline gyros have become better understood, it seems that gyrocopters designs have become somewhat larger and more complex in general than the familiar layout pioneered by early companies such as Igor Bensen and Ken Brock.  
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There were quite a few planes from Canada at Sun 'N Fun. When you consider that it's still snowing up there and it's in the 80's here, it shouldn't be too surprising!  
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This "Super Caravan" drew a lot of admirers. That's one big airplane for one engine... turbine power is becoming increasingly popular in gen-av aircraft.  
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News Flash: Godzilla Junior was recently reported in the vicinity of Lakeland, Florida, and was reportedly asking people if they knew anything about Sport Pilot training... film at eleven!  
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Not to be confused with Steen Aero Lab, an Italian company named just "Aerolab" offered this attractive low-wing sport airplane. They plan to offer other versions with high and parasol wings as well.  
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This is a Cieslak Model 2.  
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OK, this one really blew us away. This is Graham White's stunning restoration job of an ultra-rare Continental IV-1430 inverted-V 12-cylinder engine, producing 1500 hp. 23 were built for the nearly-forgotten "Hyper" engine technology development project from the WW2 era, but only 3 still exist... and this is the only one that can actually run! (We *think* we heard it running, though we didn't get a chance to see it firsthand. Assuming that the incredible commotion heard daily from the engine demo area was indeed this engine... and I don't know what else it could possibly have been... let me tell you, it was loud even in our booth and the RV camping area!) Graham is from Lake City, FL.  
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Front view of the IV-1430. The engine turns the opposite way of most, so the prop is really a reverse-indexed DC-3 unit. We're fortunate to have folks like Mr. White who appreciate the value in preserving obscure machines like the IV-1430 for future generations to understand what was once cutting-edge technology.  
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A popular display was this real Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) on display by the NASA tent.  
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This photo is dedicated to everyone who's ever struggled to fix a balky airplane engine. Just imagine having to troubleshoot THIS thing... and don't forget it's all radiation hardened, highly heated, vibration resistant, operated between sea level pressure and a hard vacuum, uses cryogenic fuel, and by the way, it's man-rated and reusable. YIKES!  
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I've heard of hot-rodders replacing engines in their cars, but a truck with a Rolls-Royce Griffin... that's a new one! Note the two shafts for the counter-rotating props. Griffins were used on the Fairey Firefly and the Avro Shackleton, and a few other (mostly one-off) aircraft. The dimensions were intentionally made close to that of the Merlin to ease the adaptation process between the two.  
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The Vari-Viggen was one of Burt Rutan's first homebuilt designs, and is still a sought-after airplane. This one is a static display at the Florida Air Museum.  
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This is a Cirrus VK-30, the 6-seat homebuilt design that launched the Cirrus Design Corp. It's certainly among the sleekest homebuilts ever designed.  
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This Quickie is on display by the Museum pavillion.  
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The Vietnam Helicopter Pilots Association had this Huey and Loach on display near the front gate.  
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Go ahead, come up with a pun for this. You know you want to. (We haven't been able to determine whether the 19-shot beer launcher was actually used in combat.)  
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For many, the educational forums are one of the best reasons to attend Sun 'N Fun. There are a wide variety of topics covered during the one-hour sessions, and there's no charge to sit in and learn something new.  
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William Wynne talks to a crowd during an engine forum. William always has a lot of valuable and interesting observations, try to catch his forums if you can.  
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Patrick Panzera mans the booth for CONTACT! magazine, the prime source of info on alternative aircraft engines of all types. The indoor vendor booths are always very popular, especially during the heat of the afternoon.  
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This is a wind tunnel used to demonstrate basic aerodynamics.  
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This Lysander is rarely seen in the US. It's a large, ungainly, and completely cool aircraft... truly a monument to functionality and utility!  
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This P-63 King Cobra is owned by Fantasy of Flight, but lives at the Florida Air Museum.  
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The Emil Buehler Restoration Skills Center is a place where folks can learn the many skills needed to build or restore aircraft of all types.  
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The Lockheed XFV-1 "Pogo" VTOL aircraft is looking good. Hopefully the restoration will be finished soon, though it's an all-volunteer effort so it's hard to set a definite timeframe.  
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One side of the shop has aluminum construction. This is a Zenith CH-701 STOL airframe. I was told that they have an STC from the FAA for the paint cans.  
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This is a wing section.  
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Here, the finer points of building aluminum flight surfaces are taught.  
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Whatizit? It's a harmonic prop balancing system. The prop in this demo is small, but the technique for balancing a full-scale prop is the same.  
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This is a section of a Cozy fuselage being built over a simple wooden form. First the foam is inserted and the inside surface is glassed; later, the outside surface can be glassed.  
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These folks are working on various aspects of composite construction.  

Wednesday, April 5 - Part 2 April 5, 2006
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Article by Mike Whaley
 
More Wednesday photos for you!


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Airshow pilot Matt Chapman talks with Dave Stone.  
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Many folks were interested in the S1-C in our booth. This 1970s Pitts is owned by Barrett Brummett.  
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Our friends at Gesoco Industries was next to our tent and had the new 125hp R-263 radial engine on display. This engine is now running in a test cell and is targeted at folks building light-sport aircraft. It shares many parts in common with the M-14P radial.  
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Margaritaville was replaced by "Ace's Cafe" this year. They had live music in the evenings.  
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The Waco folks had this beautiful plane on display near the cafe again this year.  
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This is a really well-appointed cockpit, especially for an open-cockpit biplane!  
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This cutaway radial was displayed near the Waco.  
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MotoArt had this table on display at the Waco booth as well.  
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The show always starts with parachuters and biplanes.  
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And of course, here comes the flag to kick the airshow off right!  
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There were two acts which featured pairs of Christen Eagles this year.  
 
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The Spitfire was quite impressive!  
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Cavanaugh's P-40 joined the Spitfire in making strafing runs. Lots of fun to watch!  
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The P-40 glistens in the sunlight. The weather was beautiful.  
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Yak Attack! The Yaks and CJ-6s provided air cover at the beginning of the show.  
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There were several jets performing during the afternoon airshow. Here an L-39 flies in front of a T-33.  
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The Red Knight T-33 flies by Old Glory.  
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The Red Knight makes another pass.  
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This is what happens when a doctor takes up skywriting.  
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The TBM Avenger is a BIG aircraft. It's a good thing they could fold the wings!  
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Despite it's size, the Avenger is actually fairly compact when folded up. It was displayed with bombs in the bomb bay.  
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There were a ton of T-6s, each with a unique and interesting color scheme.  
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There were many CJ-6s and Yaks present, with a large variety of colorful schemes. These trainers are close cousins (but distinctly separate aircraft), and served as the communist's answer to our T-6 trainers.  
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The Focke Wulf this was seen on is really more like a Navion than a fighter, but it's trying hard to look aggressive!  
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There were some jets and a few twins as well.  
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The Cub Convoy came in on Monday, and in this part of the field all you could see was Cub Yellow.  
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DC-3s and C-47s made a good showing, with at least 5 aircraft present. L-R: two Beech 18s (C-45s), an OV-1 Mohawk, AC-47 Spooky Gunship, and C-47.  
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There are few things that represent the soul of American aviation better than a DC-3 or C-47.  
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The "Spooky" gunship became a legend in its own time, and served throughout the duration of Vietnam. The success of this program led directly to the development of the modern AC-130 Spectre gunships.  
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The DC-3 in American Airlines livery was a beautiful sight!  
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That's a lot of polishing!  
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This is a Temco T-35A Buckaroo, a little-known primary trainer developed from the Swift. Few were built, but they sure were pretty.  
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The T-35 project won an award for preservation. It's a lot smaller than most military trainers, about the size of an RV-4. Note the fixed slots to provide aileron control through the stall.  
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The Buckaroo is a very attractive aircraft, though it's now just a footnote in military history.  
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The T-35 might make for an interesting homebuilt replica, perhaps?  
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There was a decent variety of fighters out on the warbird line.  
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A sleek L-39 Albatros settles in for the night.  
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The OV-1 Mohawk is attractive in a unique way.  
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The OV-1 is purely functional, and that makes it beautiful.  

Thursday, April 6 April 6, 2006
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Article by Mike Whaley
 
Thursday was another great day, but we still suffered from limited Internet access. The weather remained beautiful and it seems as if the crowds have been holding steady.


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Many visitors wanted a look at the R-263. This could be a competitor to the Rotec radials that have become popular.  
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Mike Whaley and Bob Griffin chat in the Steen tent. Bob is an original Tuskeegee Airman, retired airline pilot, and one heckuva nice guy too.  
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We were surprised when an F-14 did a Mach .99 fly-by and landed, scaring the heck out of most of the folks there. Hopefully they'll make an appearance at Oshkosh, if not then this is likely to be the last time we'll ever see this awersome plane fly. It's going to be retired from service in the next few months.  
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This flock of birds must have been completely confused by the F-14, as the flock began aimlessly circling right after it flew by.  
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The Adam A500 looks a bit like an OV-10 that ate an O-2.  
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The Corvair Zenith does a morning fly-by...  
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... it sounds good!  
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Bill Clapp's KR-2S zooms by. This thing is fast!  
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The rotorcraft fly-by time followed the Corvairs, with a mix of gyrocopters and helicopters.  
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This is a Robinson R-22.  
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The Hummingbird flies over.  
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This smoke came from a grass fire in the main parking lot. It was started by an $80,000 Maserati's catalytic converter, which came into contact with dry grass. In all, 23 cars were damaged and 9 were completely destroyed. Fortunately (for the drivers at least) many were rental cars, and most importantly, nobody was hurt. Central Florida is having a bit of a drought so far this year.  
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The F-15 performs a very fast, low fly-by.  
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Everyone enjoyed seeing the Eagle do it's thing.  
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Trainers, trainers everywhere!  
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The Spitfire made some really low, fast passes.  
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John Mohr is the best in the business when it comes to flying a Stearman.  
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John proves that a stock Stearman is actually a very nimble aerobatic mount when flown by an expert.  
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The PT-17 doesn't have inverted fuel, so the engine skips when the plane goes inverted for any length of time.  
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John clearly knows every nuance of the PT-17, and squeezes every possible ounce of performance out of it.  
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Campers on Juliet Row enjoy the airshow from a slightly different perspective... it's interesting to see performances from the side.  
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The oaks provide a picturesque view.  
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We didn't get this performer's name, but it's always good to see folks doing stuff in airplanes a bit more accessible to "mere mortals" than many of the high-end megabucks airshow machines available today.  
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Spins, spins, and more spins... can you ever really get enough spins?  
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Wheeee!!! The beloved DeHavilland Super Chipmunk is a capable airplane, and it's really pretty to boot.  
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This has got to be about the most fun you can legally have in public.  
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The Chipmunk flies off the top.  
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This is a steam-powered ice cream churning machine from the early 1900s. It was fascinating to watch as it built up pressure, released it, and turned the churn in an almost hypnotic cycle.  
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BMW Iseta... it attracted lots of attention this year. SNF isn't exclusively about interesting aircraft.  
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This sparrowhawk did some interesting aerobatics of its own. In just over 100 years of manned powered flight, we still haven't really even come close to simulating nature!  
   

Friday, April 7 - Daytime Activities - Part 1 April 7, 2006
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Article by Mike Whaley
 
Friday was a busy day. A highlight was that Buddy, Curtis Pitts' grandson, came by, and we gave him a ride in the Skybolt during the fly-by period, followed by some acro time.